OPEN FOR PRAYER

CCDP_150_Orange

Listen

We invite you to listen to the
Easter Oratorio
by J.S. Bach. 

Read

We invite you to read with us the text from Matthew 28.

After the Sabbath, at dawn on the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to look at the tomb.

There was a violent earthquake, for an angel of the Lord came down from heaven and, going to the tomb, rolled back the stone and sat on it. His appearance was like lightning, and his clothes were white as snow. The guards were so afraid of him that they shook and became like dead men.

The angel said to the women, “Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. He is not here; he has risen, just as he said. Come and see the place where he lay. Then go quickly and tell his disciples: ‘He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him.’ Now I have told you.”

So the women hurried away from the tomb, afraid yet filled with joy, and ran to tell his disciples. Suddenly Jesus met them. “Greetings,” he said. They came to him, clasped his feet and worshiped him. Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid. Go and tell my brothers to go to Galilee; there they will see me.”

While the women were on their way, some of the guards went into the city and reported to the chief priests everything that had happened. When the chief priests had met with the elders and devised a plan, they gave the soldiers a large sum of money, telling them, “You are to say, ‘His disciples came during the night and stole him away while we were asleep.’ If this report gets to the governor, we will satisfy him and keep you out of trouble.” So the soldiers took the money and did as they were instructed. And this story has been widely circulated among the Jews to this very day.

Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”

The Crucifixion of Jesus (Isenheim Altarpiece), Mathias Grunewald, circa 1512.
(Click the image to enlarge)

Reflect

  • Let your inside noise quiet, and put yourself in God’s presence. Invite the Holy Spirit to guide your prayer.
  • Gaze at the image with openness, and seek to see with God’s eyes.
  • Notice what stirs within you. What connection does this image make with your life? Take your time.
  • Respond to God about what you are seeing and sensing. Let the image continue to remind you to seek God throughout this season of Lent.

(modified excerpt from the Spiritual Disciplines Handbook by Adele Ahlberg Calhoun).

Pray

Lord of life and power,
through the mighty resurrection of your Son,
you have overcome the old order of sin and death
and have made all things new in him.
May we, being dead to sin
and alive to you in Jesus Christ,
reign with him in glory,
who with you and the Holy Spirit is alive,
one God, now and for ever.

We invite you to add your prayer requests below, and pray for one another by ‘replying’ to the prayer requests or clicking the ‘pray’ button. 

  • Gaza
    For an end to the heartbreaking violence, especially that perpetrated against civilians such as the two women and eight children killed in a refugee camp.

The Story behind our

Tracking Organ

Our magnificent three manual, tracker-action organ was installed in the chancel of the church in the spring of 1982 and dedicated to the Glory of God and in memory of those who died in the First World War and the Second World War.

The organ, built by the Karl Wilhelm Company of Mont St. Hilaire, Quebec, has a classical continental design. The case is made of white oak and the pipe shades are of carved butternut. Voiced in the classic French style, its 36 stops and 50 ranks are capable of interpreting a wide variety of organ literature.

Installation required considerable changes to the chancel including moving the altar forward and arranging choir seating to either side. These renovations prompted the design and production of our award-winning Benedicite Kneelers, done in needlepoint by a dedicated group of church members.